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Does anybody know what this symbol presents? enter image description here

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enter image description here

Figure 1. Tri-state buffers with opposite control logic. Image source.

It's a combination or overlay of the two symbols in Figure 1. Rotate the symbol on the right by 180° and overlay on the symbol on the left.

enter image description here

Figure 2. Borrowing the symbol from KingDuken's answer but changing the infill to show the two buffers.

If the control signal is high the gate transmits from left to right. If the control signal is low the gate transmits from right to left.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ That's a really neat visual representation :) I like how you did that on Figure 2. \$\endgroup\$ – user103380 Aug 18 '18 at 17:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ Workflow: Greenshot screen grabber | XNView image manipulation, using the Levels tool to remove the JPEG artifacts | paste into Windows Paint and use the good ol' paint can to fill. You can see that Paint hasn't covered the dithered pixels. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Aug 18 '18 at 17:38
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As the others have said, it is a transmission gate. To further explain, these transmission gates are driven by CMOS-based switches and they behave similarly to a relay.

Figure 1

Figure 1: Circuit equivalence and its symbol. Picture from Electronic-Tutorials.

It behaves very much so of a tristate buffer. Below is a truth table for such a device.

enter image description here

Table 1: Truth Table for Transmission Gate. Table is on the same page as the previous link.

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It's just a transmission gate. It will selectively block or pass a signal level from the input to the output.

Try a web search if you don't know how they work.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Web search if we know to search for transmission gate :) \$\endgroup\$ – LXSoft Sep 24 '19 at 18:51

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