1
\$\begingroup\$

This question already has an answer here:

If I have a circuit that is designed for a ceramic, SMD, 0402, 1uF, 10%, 10V rated capacitor, and I swap in a ceramic, SMD, 0402, 1uF, 10%, 25V capacitor would anything change in the circuit?

Would the performance of the capacitor change in any significant or measurable way?

\$\endgroup\$

marked as duplicate by Lior Bilia, Dmitry Grigoryev, winny, Sparky256, Dave Tweed Sep 9 '18 at 16:02

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3
\$\begingroup\$

With high value ceramics like that, a higher specified voltage will mean a higher capacitance at your operating voltage. That is, the capacitor won't lose as much of its zero volts rated capacitance to voltage coefficient.

In decoupling applications, a little extra capacitance is a good thing. Given the tolerance of these capacitors, it's unlikely the circuit has been designed to rely on a particular reduced value.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ My experience with high value ceramics in small packages has not been as you describe. A higher specified voltage rating does not dictate its capacitance under DC bias. It only dictates the range of safe voltages that can be applied. In many cases, higher-V-rated caps have shown similar or worse Capacitance vs. Voltage performance. I've used the manufacturers' tools (e.g. Murata Simsurfing) to demonstrate this in the past. \$\endgroup\$ – Kevin Kruse Sep 5 '18 at 18:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Agree with Kevin. It's more of a physical size (including z hight) for a given capacitance and high k material. \$\endgroup\$ – Mike Sep 5 '18 at 18:41

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.