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I want to calculate the current labeled in the diagram \$i\$. I am thinking that since there is 3V it would be as straightforward as \$\frac{3V}{6\Omega}\$ for the current in that branch labeled. Is that the correct thinking or am I missing some concept? I see that there is 2A being delivered as well, but would that change my answer?

schematic diagram

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You need to use superposition to solve this circuit.

Superposition means solve for the current i due to the voltage source, with the current source set to 0A (i.e. current source disconnected). Then, find the current i due to the current source, with the voltage source set to 0V (i.e. voltage source shorted). Then, add the two together to get the final answer. Good luck!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks! Also, if i was to do this using the nodal method, would I consider the entire 3V wire in the first section to be a single node? \$\endgroup\$ – Jytrex Sep 28 '18 at 21:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ What do you mean by "the entire 3V wire in the first section"? \$\endgroup\$ – Selvek Sep 28 '18 at 22:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ top left corner to the intersection where i is. \$\endgroup\$ – Jytrex Sep 28 '18 at 22:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ When calculating the effects of the current source, you replace the voltage source with a short. So yes, that would be a single node. \$\endgroup\$ – Selvek Sep 28 '18 at 22:16

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