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The data width and cycle rate are used to determine the bandwidth, or the total amount of data that the bus can transmit. An 8-bit bus (1-byte data width) that operates at a cycle rate of 1,000 MHz (1,000,000 times per second) can transfer 8 Mbps (1 MBps). The text bove from the book.

The question is: Do we multiply data width and cycle rate to determine bandwidth? So, 8-bit * 1000 MHz = 8000 000 000 bites per second = 8Gbps = 1GBps ?

Could you please help to solve the problem)))

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    \$\begingroup\$ 1,000 MHz is not 1,000,000 times per second. Please fix the typos in your question; otherwise, we have no idea what you're talking about. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Oct 4 '18 at 13:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ Do you mean 1 GBps? And 1,000,000 times per second is equivalent to 1 MHz, not 1,000 MHz. So perhaps you should do some editing. \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Oct 4 '18 at 13:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @WhatRoughBeast thanks for correction. Edited my mistake 1GBps. Struggling to understand the books solution. \$\endgroup\$ – marvB Oct 4 '18 at 13:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ If that is a verbatim quote from the book, the book has a typo. \$\endgroup\$ – pipe Oct 4 '18 at 14:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ You seem to have invented a new unit of data: "bites". \$\endgroup\$ – Simon B Oct 4 '18 at 14:05
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The simple answer would be yes, you do.

If you widen a bus from 8 bits to 16 bits, you get two times the bandwidth. If you double the cycle rate, you also get double the bandwidth.

But be aware that the transfer rate over a bus might not match the clock speed. There are all sorts of techniques to increase the transfer rate, such as sending data on the leading and trailing edges of the clock.

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The data width and cycle rate are used to determine the bandwidth, or the total amount of data that the bus can transmit. An 8-bit bus (1-byte data width) that operates at a cycle rate of 1,000 MHz (1,000,000 times per second) can transfer 8 Mbps (1 MBps).

This is a typo. Replacing 1,000 MHz by 1 MHz makes everything line up. Your calculations are correct.

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