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Is it possible to calculate maximum switching frequency of IGBT having only datasheet in hands?

https://www.semikron.com/dl/service-support/downloads/download/semikron-datasheet-skm200gal173d-22890495.pdf

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Maybe. Depends on the datasheet which I see you didn't include \$\endgroup\$ – MCG Oct 5 '18 at 13:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ updated question @MCG \$\endgroup\$ – Max Rock Oct 5 '18 at 13:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ Thanks. This isn't really my expertise so I'd prefer not to answer, but the inclusion of the datasheet should allow for people who do know about these devices to answer \$\endgroup\$ – MCG Oct 5 '18 at 13:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ Having it in your hands doesn't mean you have read it. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Oct 5 '18 at 13:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ What's wrong with fig. 8 - typical switching times? \$\endgroup\$ – Alexander von Wernherr Oct 5 '18 at 14:00
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You presumably want to know the maximum switching frequency for switching a specific level of current with a specific cooling arrangement. Knowing the maximum switching frequency for switching minimal current can be determined using the switching times would not be of much use.

To properly apply the device, you need to determine the power loss due to switching and the power loss due to carrying current. You then need to determine how to cool the device sufficiently to maintain the junction temperatures within safe limits. To do that, you need to know the behavior of the load current, current vs time for each junction including the diode junctions.

For any practical purpose, the answer is no. You can not determine the maximum switching frequency using just the data sheet. You must analyze the behavior of the load and the cooling system.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for answer, Charles. If maximum switching frequency is around 33kHz, how much of it I can use with sufficent cooling and relative good load terms? \$\endgroup\$ – Max Rock Oct 6 '18 at 6:13
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    \$\begingroup\$ You can use a relatively good percentage of that. \$\endgroup\$ – Charles Cowie Oct 6 '18 at 13:12

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