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I have a refrigerator that stopped working. A few years ago the board was burnt near a relay contact therefore I looked at the board as the primary culprit. I am trying to test the relays to determine if these are broken but have no experience with this and the information I got was not very helpful. For the relay 832A-1C-S I tested the resistance (the two bottom pins) and I got 153.8 ohms. Does this mean (according to specs; link below) that this relay is not working? For the 812H-1A-S I am not sure if there is anything I can test with a multimeter. Any help will be appreciated.

The datasheets for these relays are: https://www.mouser.com/datasheet/2/378/832a-257239.pdf http://www.songchuan.com/db/pictures/AdminModules/PDT/PDT090410001/201191914401494858.pdf

Relays

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The zig-zag line indicates a coil. Honestly it is most always the contacts that wear out, and is a common problem with relays with a high usage rate. Rather than fuss with them just search the web or the manufactures site for replacements. These are sealed in epoxy, so no DIY fix. \$\endgroup\$ – Sparky256 Oct 11 '18 at 2:28
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From the datasheet, the coil resistance is supposed to be about 155\$\small\Omega\$, then your relay from this information seems not to be damaged though it doesn´t mean it´s or not. The coil may be good but there can be a failure with the mechanical contacts.

So to make sure it´s working or not, power it with a 12\$\small Vdc\$ voltage source and try to light up a led or to deliver power to any other load.

enter image description here

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One way to test the relay is to apply and remove the stated voltage across the coil (12 VDC for those shown) and check continuity across the contacts with a multimeter set to Ohms or to Continuity (which beeps, so you don't have to watch the meter).

The voltage source could be a 9-volt battery, which might be sufficient for relay pull-in, but if that doesn't work, use a 12-volt power supply or even car battery (with care: don't short-circuit a car battery!).

When current is supplied, the normally open (NO) contacts should close and normally closed (NC) contacts should open.

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