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I want to connect 2 devices to one USB. Device #1 is a small audio DAC with USB A male connector. Device #2 needs only power.

The question is, do I need to do a special separation for that or this solution is good to go? If I need special power split where I can read about this?

Thanks!

device

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    \$\begingroup\$ Be mindful of the power consumption of each device. Total current cannot exceed the USB rating. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 17, 2018 at 18:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for advice. I measure consumptions both of the devices and I perfectly fit into USB rating \$\endgroup\$
    – Evgeniy
    Oct 17, 2018 at 18:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ Then if device 2 is not a load that could possibly disturb the DC levels (nothing with frequent switching or high inductance), this scheme is probably ok. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 17, 2018 at 18:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ The potential problem is that the power requested by Device #1 won't be enough for the combination. Most USB hosts work just fine when devices lie about power requirements, but a strict one might shut you down. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ben Voigt
    Oct 17, 2018 at 19:09

2 Answers 2

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Your proposal looks like it will work , however you need to watch the power consumption of the two devices, if you are using a usb wall plug these will usually work at 5V 2A but they should say on them if any different , you can then use an ammeter to measure current draw , additionlly you can buy 5V plugs with a higher amperage if needed

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The question is, do I need to do a special separation for that or this solution is good to go? If I need special power split where I can read about this?

The solution looks fine.

USB was initially intended for providing minimal power to devices. One port can provide 500mA. Technically the USB spec does not allow for splitters or inline devices, and technically you need A type for hosts and B type for devices (unless using OTG. (even though many people sell devices that do not conform to the USB spec, its probably not that big of a deal unless you want the USB logo on your product) If you want to learn more check out USB.org or USB IF.

USB A-Type

Found on host controllers in computers and hubs, the A-style connector is a flat, rectangular interface. This interface holds the connection in place by friction which makes it very easy for users to connect and disconnect. Instead of round pins, the connector uses flat contacts which can withstand continuous attachment and removal very well. The A-socket connector provides a "downstream" connection that is intended for use solely on host controllers and hubs. It was not intended for use as an "upstream" connector on a peripheral device.

USB B-Type

The B-style connector is designed for use on USB peripheral devices. The B-style interface is squarish in shape, and has slightly beveled corners on the top ends of the connector. Like the A connector, it uses the friction of the connector body to stay in place. The B-socket is an "upstream" connector that is only used on peripheral devices. Because of this, the majority of USB applications require an A-B cable.
Source: https://www.cablestogo.com/learning/connector-guides/usb

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