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To be clear, I'm looking for a program I could use to redesign the TurboGrafX hardware at gate level, but to gate to gate, just for functionality.

Also, given that I'm interested in GPU design, what program do they most likely use for hardware design at a company like NVidia?

The only program I know of that could do this kind of thing is Logisim, which isn't industry standard, by a long shot.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What do you mean speaking 'redesing' -- is it just designing a functional copy from scratch or reverse-engineering the existing chip? \$\endgroup\$ – lvd Oct 16 '18 at 18:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ redesigning the entire TurboGrafX system, so that I can print the circuit and play on it (hopefully) \$\endgroup\$ – Jack Kasbrack Oct 16 '18 at 18:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ Your question basically amounts to "how do I design digital electronics?". There are too many different possible approaches to answer, but perhaps more relevantly, the answer to your question isn't specific to retro computing so is off topic here \$\endgroup\$ – Jules Oct 16 '18 at 20:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ sorry, didn't think of that. Do I delete the question? \$\endgroup\$ – Jack Kasbrack Oct 16 '18 at 20:10
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    \$\begingroup\$ @JackKasbrack You could, if you want. Personally, I think it's good to have examples of off-topic questions for making a consistent site policy, but we've already got lots of off-topic questions so it's 50 50 either way. Whatever you think is best. \$\endgroup\$ – wizzwizz4 Oct 17 '18 at 5:56
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At Nvidia, they probably use cadence. I think that's pretty much the only option when it comes to designing digital circuitry of that scale on cutting edge processes. But don't bother trying to use that unless you are taking graduate level digital design courses and have access to the software through a university or similar, the software is incredibly complex and licenses run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars per seat. And for that kind of design, you're usually working at an RTL level or higher, so no schematics.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So what would be my alternative? \$\endgroup\$ – Jack Kasbrack Oct 22 '18 at 1:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ What's your goal? You said print it out? Like the schematic? Is that your ultimate goal? Nobody does digital design with schematics these days, it's too tedious. Instead, it is done with HDL. You write a description of the functionality in Verilog or VHDL, then simulate it, and if that works either drop it on an FPGA or run it through cadence to get GDSII to send to the fab to get a chip made. Do you want to learn about this design process? \$\endgroup\$ – alex.forencich Oct 24 '18 at 18:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ yes, but anyway, I'll accept your answer now. please add your comment to it. \$\endgroup\$ – Jack Kasbrack Oct 26 '18 at 15:35

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