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How do a newbie find the best components ? is there site or something ? the part number is not exactly user friendly. I know there are the classics, that I suppose improve over the years, but there are also modern alternatives...

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  • \$\begingroup\$ "How do a newbie find the best components?" Best for what? "Is there site or something?" Yes, component suppliers have websites. "The part number is not exactly user friendly." What are you hoping for? "I know there are the classics, that I suppose improve over the years, ..." No, they stay the same over the years otherwise you couldn't replace one in a repair. "... but there are also modern alternatives." Yes there are. You have to read the datasheets to compare the important parameters for your application. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Commented Oct 22, 2018 at 21:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ what is or something? .... what is a user friendly part number? \$\endgroup\$
    – jsotola
    Commented Oct 22, 2018 at 21:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Experience, mostly. For something generic (op amps, logic) I'll search a distributor website (Digikey, Mouser, Arrow...). For something more specialized, I'll search a specific manufacturer I've had good luck with in the past for similar ICs. \$\endgroup\$
    – Selvek
    Commented Oct 22, 2018 at 21:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ @jsotola something could be a pdf. A user friendly part number could be ST4AUDIOOPAMPS10W2018 lol, but i that you cant search if not specific. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jackt
    Commented Oct 22, 2018 at 22:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Transistor "No, they stay the same over the years otherwise you couldn't replace one in a repair" that make my question even more important. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jackt
    Commented Oct 22, 2018 at 22:04

1 Answer 1

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it depends vastly on what you are trying to accomplish.

the best component is one which can do the job you want it to do, for as long as you want to do it, where you want to do it, so as to speak. There are some components, particularly aerospace-type microcontrollers come to mind here, that are extremely expensive. this is mainly due to the testing and additional radiation hardening involved, but there is no way you would use one in a completely unrelated application, like a TV remote or some such.

The best approach is to define a full and comprehensive specification for what you want to do, and then select components based on that. This can go out the window a little bit in industry, as some companies have huge stocks of some components they just want used, so you can see micros lurking in some devices that are definitely overspec for what they are doing.

after that, find a good online shop like digikey, mouser, element14 or RS, and use their parametric filters to select the right component.

some things like capacitors perform best at certain frequency ranges, for example electrolytics are only really suited to lower frequency, such as ripple blanking on power supplies, whereas ceramics are used for high frequency applications, such as removing DC bias from some AC signal, such as audio. carbon film resistors also tend to add noise, and wirewound have an inductance all of their own...

I hope this helps, otherwise perhaps consider re-phrasing your question.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ yeah I guess that sites like mouser are the best option... Thanks for the generic information too! \$\endgroup\$
    – Jackt
    Commented Oct 22, 2018 at 21:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Jackt Well places like Mouser or Digikey or whomever are not entirely the best place for manufacturing recommendations. Contact your manufacturer and ask them to recommend you a good place to get this product. \$\endgroup\$
    – user103380
    Commented Oct 22, 2018 at 22:50

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