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I'm looking for a switch that can connect/disconnect 8 signals at a time with one button/lever/slide whatever. Power requirements are very low. I do not want to use analog switches due to interference with my measurements, which are in the nanoamp range.

I would prefer something that is through-hole or surface mount instead of solder lugs. Does such a switch exist?

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marked as duplicate by laptop2d, Dave Tweed Oct 25 '18 at 20:43

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    \$\begingroup\$ How do you feel about relays? Would one switch controlling 8 SPST relays (or 4 DPST relays etc.) work for you? \$\endgroup\$ – Jack B Oct 25 '18 at 17:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Reed relays are hard to beat. Even so, if they're PCB-mounted, you'll have to do outguard-rings around them to quell leakage currents - that requires a buffer amplifier. \$\endgroup\$ – glen_geek Oct 25 '18 at 17:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ Have you considered a series of rotary switches, interlocked by all being on the same shaft? Like this: uk.rs-online.com/web/p/rotary-switches/0327686 \$\endgroup\$ – Will Oct 25 '18 at 18:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ Jack B Good thinking, 4 DPDT telecom relays and a switch would probably be much cheaper that an 8PST switch even if one still existed. Modular switchs like that used to exist but I can't remember the company and they probably didn't survive the digital age. \$\endgroup\$ – Robert Endl Oct 25 '18 at 19:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Jack B: I would like the power consumed by the switching mechanism to be zero, so purely mechanical is highly preferred. \$\endgroup\$ – QuestionMan Oct 26 '18 at 13:18
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enter image description here

Figure 1. Various "wafer" rotary switches."

The common forms of these wafer rotary switches have 30° detents and one or more "wipers" contacts which switch between the twelve contacts. The wipers and contacts can be arranged in

  • 12-way, 1-pole
  • 6-way, 2-pole
  • 4-way, 3-pole
  • 3-way, 4-pole
  • 2-way, 6-pole

Usually a stop ring can be added to restrict the number of switchable positions. Wafers can be stacked if more poles are required.

For your application two 2-way, 6-pole wafers should suffice as you only require eight poles.

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