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I do not understand the what sending or receiving end means in 3 phase circuit analysis.

Aside: Also I am struggling to understand 3-phase just in general with respect to circuit analysis so if there are any links to helpful sites, please add them.

Thank you

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In three-phase power analysis it is more common to refer to the supply and load rather than the sending end and the receiving end. The supply end is usually the sending end, but is possible for the load end to return power to the source. If someone has solar panels on their house or some other renewable energy system, they could send power to the source if they use less power than their renewable energy system supplies. In that was people often refer to their electric meter "running backwards" or their power use being negative. The source is still the considered the to be the normal "sending end," but some customers are exceptions, so their power flow is "negative" or the opposite direction of the standard.

Unless other wise stated, the voltage of a three phase system is the voltage between any two phases. Equal or balanced voltage among the phases is assumed unless otherwise specified. For a three phase, 4-wire, wye source, both the line-to-line and the line-to-neutral voltage should be specified, such as 380/220 V. If only one voltage is specified it is normally the line-to-line voltage. Just the line-to-neutral voltage would be specified only if referring a to a single-phase circuit.

Reference material links are not usually given in this forum because there is no system for repairing dead links. You will need to search for educational material yourself. It may help to use advanced search tools such as limiting the search to *.edu sites or searching for *.pdf documents.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you Charles Cowie this was very helpful. Much Appreciated \$\endgroup\$ – Teyash Arjun Nov 2 '18 at 19:30
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In general:

  • Sending = generator, power plant, etc.
  • Receiving = load, end user, your computer plugged into the wall
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  • \$\begingroup\$ Follow the power flow. \$\endgroup\$ – TimWescott Nov 2 '18 at 16:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does this mean that the receiving end voltage would be the voltage across the loads in one line of the circuit? Assuming a star connection this would be the voltage over the loads with respect to the neutral point. \$\endgroup\$ – Teyash Arjun Nov 2 '18 at 17:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, since the load receives the power. Though the definition of the load might be slightly dependent on the context. In a three phase system the load is a three phase load as well if not said otherwise. \$\endgroup\$ – Horror Vacui Nov 6 '18 at 19:12

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