0
\$\begingroup\$

I'm making a temperature sensor ciruit on a 1×1 inch PCB and needed to put some components on the other side to fit everything. All the components are through ole.

Is this feasible, I was able to order the boards and it said there wasn't an error, but I wanted to make sure I didn't do anything incorrectly.

PCB Board scemeatic

\$\endgroup\$
3
\$\begingroup\$

There is no PCB design or electrical reason this is not feasible and in most cases you would need to define a custom DRC for this to be an error. Note that unless you have appropriate 3d models interference between TH parts won't be checked either.

With two sided TH components, generally speaking at least one side will have to be soldered by hand for commercial production. So if you persue commercial production with a contract PCBA assembler or with your own production line you will likely pay much more per board to manufacture . With one sided TH it can be wave soldered , greatly reducing cost.

If you are assembling small runs by hand anyeay, or designing as a kit, this may make things more difficult, but generally not as big a problem.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

Although possible, that seems cumbersome and you run the risk of the pins and solder colliding with other components. Leading to placing components in awkward positions (Eg., your electrolytic and the connector).

You might be better off simply replacing at least one of the components with a surface-mount one. If you stick to the larger sizes (eg., 1206 and up), these are really not that hard to solder by hand.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

If you are able to solder both components into their place and you ensure the via has enough diameter to accommodate both components pins, I see no reason it would not work. That is if everything connected to the same pad is supposed to be the same node. Just make sure you pay attention to the order you solder your parts onto the PCB.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Placing components on both sides of a board is avoided where possible, as it makes board assembly more difficult, but it's certainly allowed.

What isn't allowed, however, is placing a pin inside another component. The large diode on the back of the board has a pin that will stick into the resistor R2 on the front. Move R2 down until it is aligned with R1 -- not only will this resolve the collision, but it should make room to put the diode on the front of the board.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ From the pin spacing, I suspect that he may intend to stand the resistors on-end, which would ensure the diode lead won't hit the resistor - even so, one end of R2 may short to a diode lead, unless care is taken in assembly. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Nov 6 '18 at 4:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ The silkscreened lines for the resistors make me think otherwise. If the resistor were intended to be mounted vertically, there would typically be a circle marked around where the body is meant to go. \$\endgroup\$ – duskwuff Nov 6 '18 at 4:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ R2 could be fitted raised so that it does not contact the diode pin \$\endgroup\$ – Jasen Nov 6 '18 at 9:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.