0
\$\begingroup\$

i bought this soldering station from the USA and it is 110 V. I need it to be 220 V. Is this possible without external tools?

There are 3 Trimpots: V1 VR1 VR2

This is the inside of the station:

enter image description here

enter image description here

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ what do the label and the instruction manual say? \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Nov 6 '18 at 16:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ what are the trimpots for? \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Nov 6 '18 at 16:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sometimes devices like this don't need any adjustment made to work on 220V. Check the label on it, or the manual that came with it, like jsotola suggested. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Nov 6 '18 at 17:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ This doesn't have a big transformer on the AC input, which means they most likely send the 110 straight through to the iron, this also means that there is no transformer to step the voltage up/down. \$\endgroup\$ – laptop2d Nov 6 '18 at 17:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ Check for voltage on large electrolytic caps, near the input rectifier. If it is less than 250V, then it is not for 220V. For "universal" supplies (100 -240V) the cap should be no less than for 400V \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Nov 6 '18 at 18:21
3
\$\begingroup\$

First check the specs of the unit using its manual. Many devices (such as phone chargers) accept a large range of voltages so that they may be used all over the world, this station may be the same.

Alternatively, you could find a step down converter that will convert the 220 VAC to 110/120 VAC (something like this: https://www.amazon.ca/Voltage-Converter-220-240-110/dp/B001ES8YY6). Just want to note that simply using an adapter would not be enough because the source voltage would still be 220 VAC.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

The power appears to be derived from a switching power supply based on a Power Integrations TOP253.

If the power supply has been designed for 80-265VAC operation, it will probably work as-is (except for the plug). It could have been designed as a doubler feeding the supply, but it does not appear to be so designed.

So, refer to the manual and markings on the unit for the recommended voltage range. If you are outside of that, the effort to make it compatible internally would not be worth it.

My impression is that it probably does not have valid safety agency approvals for Western countries- looks like a somewhat shoddy Asian product.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

The controller looks as if it's an SMPS convertor. The input looks to have a simple bridge rectifier and 2 supply caps. The input voltage limitations could probably be gauged by looking at the voltage rating of those caps.
It has a transformer, and given the size the unit may be switching in the kHz range.

Unless the unit is marked to accept 110-240V as a range it is unlikely you will find any way to alter the input voltage range based on the pots in it.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Two of the electrolytic capacitors by the power jack are marked 400V 10uF. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Nov 6 '18 at 18:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ @JRE Correct, but peak from 240V AC (and most high voltage countries vary between 220 and 250V AC) is about 340V peak DC which I'd consider a bit close for 400V caps. Mostly in this type of direct rectification you'd want 450V caps to have good margins. In addition the voltage range of the series switch device (probably a FET) needs to be greater than the peak that might occur. So in a unit sold for 110V supplies it might not be rated to handle the peak voltage. \$\endgroup\$ – Jack Creasey Nov 6 '18 at 19:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.