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I'm repairing a toaster oven and have encountered this connector. What should I call it when I search? This is a power connector.

It says "R8 JD" on the base of the male part. It is 3/16" wide.

It says R8 JD on the base.

Below is the female part. It says "8 STS".

This says 8 STS.

Here they are before I disassembled it.

Before taking it apart.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I've seen these called "blade connectors", though that's a broader term. They're a pretty generic type of connector. Also "wire disconnects", usually specifically in the context of wire-to-wire connectors. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Nov 10 '18 at 0:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ related: electronics.stackexchange.com/a/200216/7036 \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Alexeev Nov 10 '18 at 7:17
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Spade connector/crimp/lug

Probably because they look vaguely like a gardening tool for digging holes in dirt.

They are similar to

  • Fork connector, which look like garden forks:

enter image description here

  • Ring connector, which are rings (an item that can be lost in the garden)

https://media.rs-online.com/t_large/F6139249-01.jpg


The end on the wire is a crimp because of how its fastened to the bare wire, and the end on the board is a through solder-mount lug because its through the board and held on with solder not crimping.

Do note that the wire in your photo appears to be rated for high-temperature because its in a hot environment. Please make sure your repair keeps or improves on the standards already set.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Have to do plus 1, as the point about temperature is very good advice. \$\endgroup\$ – Solar Mike Nov 10 '18 at 6:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ Hi[gh] Temp[erature] PC[B] [mount] spade [lug] [terminal] \$\endgroup\$ – amI Nov 10 '18 at 19:02
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I've known them as "quick connects". AMP/Tyco calls them Fastons.
enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Keystone calls them Quick-Fits. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Nov 10 '18 at 2:00
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I know them as “Lucar” or spade connectors, may well have other names though...

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    \$\begingroup\$ "Faston" is another trade name - they come in 3(?) widths, 1/8", 3/16", and (most common) 1/4". \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Nov 10 '18 at 0:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ Have seen larger, 5/16 and 7/16, may be larger - seen on diesel engine heater plugs (not the slim pencil ones but the fatter ones - with big fat yellow crimp connectors. \$\endgroup\$ – Solar Mike Nov 10 '18 at 5:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ I remember them as SPADE connectors from middle school radio & electronics class, way back in 1953. Consistent with garden implements. \$\endgroup\$ – richard1941 Nov 17 '18 at 17:19
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Spade connector. I'm in the UK, there may be regional differences in the most widely used name. I think Lucar was a brand name, from their use in automotive products by the British firm Lucas. Faston seems common in the US.

In addition to Criggie's note about cable temperature, be aware that the colour of the plastic cover on the crimp section is significant; it indicates the range of wire size that can be crimped into it, so it is loosely linked to the current rating. Check the datasheets for your chosen manufacturer, or copy the existing rating. They are likely to be roughly standardized between manufacturers, but I wouldn't guarantee it.

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These are known under many names, some of which refer to multiple types.

enter image description here

As seen above, these are known the female connectors are Push On, while the male is a Tab connector. Also known as Blade connectors, sometimes known as Spade connectors (But spade connectors are really Fork connectors). Tongue connectors is not uncommon. Quick Disconnects is a common term as well.

Male Fork and Blade connectors can fit in female blade connectors. Both ring and fork connectors can be used with screws.

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