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CR2 / 15270 Li-ion batteries normally come as 3.0v. I thought Li-ion and Lipo batteries were always 3.7v, how is that possible?

Does it require a different charger circuit than normal 3.7v li-ion/lipo batteries?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Lithium Iron Phosphate and Lithium Titanate are 3.2V and 2.4V respectively (which reduces their energy density). Your CR2 may be yet another Li chemistry, which, yes, will require a different charger (if it is rechargeable. Some Li chemistries aren't). \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Nov 13 '18 at 8:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ if you google "15270 lithium ion" most of the results claim to be 3.0v. Every other "lithium ion" battery size claim the expected 3.7v. \$\endgroup\$ – J Halcres Nov 13 '18 at 18:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ Add "datasheet" to that google search and you might find what you're looking for. Note that some of them are NOT rechargeable. \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Nov 13 '18 at 20:46
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I thought Li-ion and Lipo batteries were always 3.7v,

Actually the most common Li-ion are 3.6V. The charlatan vendors on eBay and Amazon like to incorrectly use 3.7V. You can find the Panasonic NCR18650 cells on eBay and Amazon as 3.7V. Yet the Panasonic NCR18650 datasheet says 3.6v.

There are various Li-ion chemistries. The more expensive Li-manganese, used in power tools, is 3.7V. Most Li-ion are Li-cobalt or Lithium Nickel Manganese.

The 3.2V Li-phosphate is becoming more popular especially as an automotive Lead Acid replacement. The expensive Li-titanate are 2.4V.

See the "Nominal Voltage" row of the various Li-ion batteries: Summary Table of Lithium-based Batteries


Does it require a different charger circuit than normal 3.7v li-ion/lipo batteries?

You cannot use a charger on a CR2.

The CR2 lithium (Lithium/Iron Disulfide, Li/MnO2) is a primary battery, not rechargeable. Lithium AA batteries have a nominal 1.5V. The CR2 is a dual cell, Li/MnO2 battery

LINK: Lithium (CR2) Datasheet

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Charging of a batter comes down to delivering an amount of current to a battery at a certain voltage level for a specific amount of time.

The combination of current, voltage and time actually represents energy - so what you need to make sure is whether the charger circuitry delivers the required amount of energy to the battery; given that the current and voltage don't go out of the allowed range. If they are to great, they might damage the battery. If to small, the process might never come to a hold.

Basically, in this case, it narrows down to whether the current/voltage requirements of your battery fall within the value ranges for the output current/voltage of your circuitry.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This does not answer the question about the difference in chemistry OP is asking about. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Nov 13 '18 at 8:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ Downvote - This answer is way too general for any recommendation regarding charging Li-ion batteries. Safe use and charging requires specific attention to proper procedures and handling. And even if this was addressed in the question it would not be an answer to the actual question. \$\endgroup\$ – Michael Karas Nov 13 '18 at 9:18

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