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If the stock charger for my smartphone causes the Li-ion battery to be charged in a couple of hours and I charge my phone for 8 hours a day (while I sleep) resulting in about 6 hours of full-charge time, could I increase the longevity of the battery if I use a lower current charger that results in approximately zero full-charge time (i.e. charging takes about 8 hours)? Or do smartphones take this into account and somehow reduce charging current or flicker charging on and off once a full charge has been reached?

Edit: Changed voltage to current based on the response from Juba.

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closed as off-topic by pipe, Bimpelrekkie, Dmitry Grigoryev, laptop2d, Finbarr Nov 21 '18 at 10:21

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions on the use of electronic devices are off-topic as this site is intended specifically for questions on electronics design." – pipe, Bimpelrekkie, Dmitry Grigoryev, laptop2d, Finbarr
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Using a low voltage charger will not work, the phone will probably not charge at all. The charging circuit is inside the phone not in the charger that you plug in the mains socket. If you want your battery to last longer: charge to 70% and then unplug, use phone until battery is 40% then stop using it. General truth: most people buy a new phone before the battery has worn out. You could also have the battery replaced. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Nov 14 '18 at 15:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ A lower current charger won't prevent the phone from reaching full charge, it will just take longer to get there. Phones of course terminate charging at full charge; there is some reason to believe the battery cell may last longer when it is stored at something like 70% charge. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Nov 14 '18 at 18:05
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Or do smartphones take this into account and somehow reduce charging current or flicker charging on and off once a full charge has been reached?

They do.

Any properly designed modern device with a lithium-ion battery will contain a charge controller which is aware of these issues, and which will slow down and ultimately cut off charging when the battery is nearly full. (The same charge controller is also used to display information about battery charge state on your phone.)

The AC adapter is not part of the charging process. Its only responsibility is to provide power to the device, whether it is charging or not. Using a higher current charger will not overcharge the battery, and a lower current charger may simply fail to charge the device at all.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok, I'll take your word for it. \$\endgroup\$ – Cedric Eveleigh Nov 14 '18 at 21:20
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Using a low voltage charger will not work, you can use a low current charger, if your actual charger can proide 5V/2A, and it can charge your phone in 2 hours, if you use a 5V/0.5A il will take 8h to charge your phone. But this is not really recommanded,

PS: the manufacturer of your phone designed the charge circuit to disconect the battery when the charge is complete

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi, you said: "you can use a low current charger, if your actual charger can [provide] 5V/2A, and it can charge your phone in 2 hours, if you use a 5V/0.5A [it] will take 8h to charge your phone. But this is not really [recommended]" Why is it not recommended? Do you have a citation for that? Thanks. \$\endgroup\$ – SamGibson Nov 14 '18 at 16:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ Because the electronic circuit is designed for 2A. so at the beginning he try to have 2A. and if the charger can't provide so much. The charger may heat up (I don't have a citation for that, I will look if i can found one) \$\endgroup\$ – Juba Nov 14 '18 at 16:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ Remember that a typical PC USB port cannot provide 2A & most phones will charge happily (but slowly) from a PC USB port at 0.5A approx. If you show me a reputable phone instruction book which says that's a problem, then I will read it. Otherwise, it just sounds like superstition and possible misunderstandings. There have been many previous questions here, where people have asked questions after being misled by well-meaning, but incorrect, guesses and misinformation from elsewhere. (All of this assumes the phone power adapters discussed are reputable good designs, otherwise all bets are off.) \$\endgroup\$ – SamGibson Nov 14 '18 at 16:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ I am not talking about having a problem with the phone but with the charger, if this one isn't well designed in case of over current. \$\endgroup\$ – Juba Nov 14 '18 at 17:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ "I am not talking about having a problem with the phone but with the charger, if this one isn't well designed in case of over current" Oh I see, it wasn't clear in your answer about why/who wasn't recommending it. (Also, to be clear, you don't mean the charger - we're talking about mains adapters; the charger is inside the phone). So of course, if a 0.5A adapter (in your example) isn't well designed, then there can be problems. But the same is true if the 2A adapter (in your example) also isn't well designed. Provided the 0,5A adapter is a good design, I still see no reason for a problem. \$\endgroup\$ – SamGibson Nov 14 '18 at 17:10

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