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Reference video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5-Fy4ULdPg

The chimp is climbing both wires out of phase (i would have to assume, it is in Japan), do the power lines have to be closed for the chimp to do that? How is it possible that the chimp is not electrocuted? It was stated that power was out for 1000+ people so i would have to assume the lines had to be closed for the chimp to survive climbing this?

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closed as off-topic by Voltage Spike, Nick Alexeev Nov 18 '18 at 6:05

  • This question does not appear to be about electronics design within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Clearly the wires are insulated. It's the same protection you have on the mains cables in your home. The chimp is not touching the conductors. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Nov 16 '18 at 18:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ The chimp is shocked though (by phase-ground), check the video at 1:30. \$\endgroup\$ – marcelm Nov 16 '18 at 19:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ @marcelm yeah i tried rewatching it, couldn't tell where the contact to ground was (insulated wires, insulated? jumpers, primary framing) since the chimp grabbed so many connections, and since he was technically tranqualized at that point \$\endgroup\$ – user136128 Nov 16 '18 at 19:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ It looks to me that the current flow is between his right leg and right arm (grabbing a phase wire) and his left foot (grabbing a metal mechanical support struct). I don't see where his left arm is, though... \$\endgroup\$ – marcelm Nov 16 '18 at 20:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because the question is not about electronics design. \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Alexeev Nov 18 '18 at 6:05
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It looks to me like the power cables are insulated. That's not common in my neck of the woods. If the power was turned off, it was for additional safety.

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Yes, the wires are insulated. It might be due to the congested urbanization. I have been seeing the same thing even here in India, over the last 10 years. Earlier, they used to be bare wires and regularly caused injury to either people carrying long poles etc, or they got torn in cyclones and fell to the ground.

Sometimes the electric poles are very high (12 meters or more). In those I have seen bare wires at the very top, insulated ones below that, then phone and TV lines just above the pedestrian's head. The voltages of the bare wires and insulated ones are also different, but I don't remember what they are. The bare wires usually have better safeguard to prevent sagging, than the insulated ones.

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Looks like there's a splice or something which is not covered in insulation where the chimp gets shocked.enter image description here

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