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I'm a hobbyist solderer using tin lead solder to occasionally repair broken electronics. As I don't solder all day every day, I use my normal writing desk in my bedroom, which stands next to my bed, for soldering, cleaning it afterwards with soap and water to remove flux residue, etc. As solder pops and splashes, there may be some little solder leftovers lying around in the room.

Is this safe?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes soldering is pretty safe and I would not worry. It is only when your doing it on the daily or for years you need to worry. If you are concerned, just get a fan to blow air across your workstation and that will be more than sufficient. FYI leaded solder is worse for you but easier to work with than unleaded as it melts at lower tempatures. \$\endgroup\$ – Curious Diode Nov 17 '18 at 11:29
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It is a good idea to you wash your hands after using the leaded solder or else it can sometimes get stored inside the brain. Make sure you use a fume extractor (or if the area is well ventilated a PC fan will do the job). Also lead-free solder can actually be worse than leaded solder due to the fact that they replace the lead with other chemicals which release toxic fumes.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Actually, normal soldering practice does not produce appreciable lead fumes. See, for instance, diamondenv.wordpress.com/2011/01/06/… The fumes from the flux are probably more dangerous. Transfer from skin to mouth is also a much bigger risk. \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Nov 17 '18 at 16:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ @WhatRoughBeast Most solder has a built in flux core \$\endgroup\$ – F.Ahmed Nov 24 '18 at 8:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ Sure. But resin flux fumes are far less dangerous than lead fumes. They do not (as far as I know) lead to irreversible neurological damage. At most they'll irritate your throat. \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Nov 24 '18 at 14:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ @WhatRoughBeast It is not the fumes of the lead that gets stored in your brain but the actual lead getting on your hands \$\endgroup\$ – F.Ahmed Nov 24 '18 at 15:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ That was the point in my original comment. Glad you agree. If the danger is getting lead on your hands and "It is not the fumes of the lead that gets stored in your brain", why "Make sure you use a fume extractor"? \$\endgroup\$ – WhatRoughBeast Nov 24 '18 at 15:13

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