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I've been learning about solar systems and I keep seeing that the systems feed power in to batteries, which is then fed in to the house via an inverter, typically 24v or 48v.

However, most houshold electronics are rated for 100-240v, and grid power shows up as 110v. My novice understanding leads me to think that at such a lower voltgae, the Amp draw would be much higher and cause breakers to switch off.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is a very broad question and it sounds like you haven't done any research yourself before asking here. What have you learned about residential solar photovoltaic systems, and what specifically is confusing? \$\endgroup\$ Nov 25, 2018 at 2:36

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The battery system is 24 or 48 volts. The inverter takes in 24 or 48 volts at high current, and converts it to standard AC voltage (110V or 220V) at lower current. That's what the house electronics actually use. ("Inverter" is sort of an informal name for a DC to AC converter.)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I feel dumb. Looked up inverters on a supply store and just now saw the second half of '48v dc inverter' is 'to 110v ac'. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 24, 2018 at 21:39
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Well, for one running things on a lower voltage doesn't necessarily mean a higher current draw. For instance, resistive loads like incandescent lights and electric heaters would draw less current at a lower voltage. Things like switching power supplies would attempt to compensate for the lower voltage by drawing more current.

However, this isn't entirely relevant as you mentioned a key component: the inverter. The inverter will convert your 24v or 48v DC into 110v AC to power any connected AC devices. The waveform coming out of the inverter is a decent approximation of what comes from the electrical grid, so the devices should behave normally and draw the same amount of current that you would expect if they were connected to normal AC line power. Where you will see an increase in current draw is at the input to the inverter, but the system would be designed to handle this.

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