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I did buy a board from this site, which basically allow me to connect buttons, switch and other controls with ease and no need to program anything: http://derekspearedesigns.com/dsd-36-button-controller-avx.html

Now, I did order some buttons and realized that they are made for some sort of connector; I tried to solder wire on the contacts but the wire breaks at the junction, as soon as you move the connection a bit. This is how the buttons looks like:

Arcade button connector

Is there a connector that slot into these connections; and is solid enough to not come off? I did look at sites that sell arcade accessories, and the only thing they sell is daisy chained wires; which is not what I need, because the board I own, require 2 connections for each button. I could cut and modify the chained wire but I want to see if I can get the correct connectors first.

The second issue is related to how to power the button LED; since they support 12V. I did buy a 12V step up that works fine with the square buttons, which takes the 5V from USB and output 12V for the LED; since the switch connections are separated from the LED connection.

But I also use this type, which has just 3 poles instead of 4; and my concern is that the board seems to be 5V tollerant, so if I add the 12V coming in from the step up device; I may fry the board?

second type of buttons with just 3 poles

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Your first picture isn't related to the second one. I probably missed in the text where you discuss why. Meanwhile, the first picture appears to show a switch body that is secured to a common microswitch. I've never had any trouble soldering those. If you have wires that just break free with a little tension, then I'd be worried about your soldering technique: surface prep, flux usage, and possibly cold solder joints. Can you show a picture of the results of your soldering work prior to it breaking free? \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Nov 24 '18 at 21:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks, the 2 buttons are different; also the connection size seems to be different. For the first one I have tried on 2 buttons, and one of the 2 broke so I threw it away, while the second has the broken wire issue. The breakage happen not on the solder joint but on the wire itself; am I using a wire that is too thin maybe? \$\endgroup\$ – rataplan Nov 24 '18 at 22:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ I misunderstood you, then. (1) It's possible that you are dealing with crappy "copper" wire. Some, cheaply made, is such a terrible amalgam that it is already brittle and becomes even more brittle under heating. (2) You may want to select wiring that is braided or twisted from many fine wires. I sometimes go to the trouble to buy copper wire made from 19 smaller filaments. It's flexible. (3) You may need heavier gauge, regardless. ... Perhaps you could show a picture of the wire and your soldering job, as well? \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Nov 24 '18 at 22:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ If the wire breaks you may be cutting into it when you strip the insulation. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Nov 25 '18 at 0:50
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They're called "quick connects". Here's a link to the DigiKey site, although any distributor (not to mention your local auto parts store, and maybe even Radio Shack) will have them.

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Those are blade connectors, or quick disconnect connectors. You can get connectors, just measure the width of the tab, and look for quick disconnect blade connectors. Try to get the proper crimping tool as well.

They are also solder tabs. What you describe is a cold solder joint. This happen a when the connection you are trying to make is not heating up the metal enough. Large metal connections need more heat so it depends on how you are trying to solder, and the strength of your soldering iron.

As for the second switch type, you are probably correct. The center pin is common to both the led and the output. If this is for a gpio input, simple method is using a voltage divider at the output. Use it to bring down the 12V back to 5V.

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