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I've been trying to place my ICs properly to allow the autorouter to route the ICs with no success, I'm a total beginner at this and I tried routing manually with no success, any hints? The board is 1 layer only.

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Is it 1 layer only? What about tracks in between the pins? And why do you have so much spacing between the components? \$\endgroup\$ – Linkyyy Dec 4 '18 at 18:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes it's only 1 Layer, I thought giving the autorouter more space to work in means it will more likely success, I have no idea about the tracks \$\endgroup\$ – Youssef Walid Dec 4 '18 at 18:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ Well, the autorouter is not always the best option. Especially not if you are not experienced with setting it up properly. What package size is those ICs in? SOIC? what is the minimum track width, maybe you can fit a track in between the pins. \$\endgroup\$ – Linkyyy Dec 4 '18 at 18:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Try routing yourself. Like Linkyyy said the autorouter is not the best. Why only 1 layer? \$\endgroup\$ – Drew Fowler Dec 4 '18 at 18:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ One layer is not very strange if OP is going to have the board made by etching or milling. \$\endgroup\$ – pipe Dec 4 '18 at 18:34
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First of all, the autorouter is awful. I suggest you lay out the ICs more closely, with the sides that have the most common connections facing each other (meaning if two sides of an IC have many connections, put them side by side to lessen the length of your traces.

It looks like you may be running traces to connect the GND pins. While this isn't inherently bad, you'd want to use a ground pour (use the polygon tool to draw an area around all ICs and name it "GND") to kill the need for those traces and open up the layout to allow you to run more traces.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I've lined them closer together, does having a ground pour require me to use a 2 layer PCB? \$\endgroup\$ – Youssef Walid Dec 4 '18 at 19:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ No, ground pours are per-layer, though on a two layer board, you would want to connect the two pours with vias. \$\endgroup\$ – t3ddftw Dec 4 '18 at 19:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ I've gotten to this , no idea what to do next.. \$\endgroup\$ – Youssef Walid Dec 4 '18 at 19:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Post your .sch and .brd to GitHub as gists and link them here, please. \$\endgroup\$ – t3ddftw Dec 4 '18 at 19:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ There you go \$\endgroup\$ – Youssef Walid Dec 4 '18 at 20:08
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You need to list the constraints you are working under. There have to be some more components on that board, even if only connectors and decoupling caps. If you're having a prototype board made, there's typically no additional charge for a 2 sided board, that will then almost always autoroute, even if it's ugly.

If you're not constrained not to do so, you can use zero ohm surface mount resistors to bridge over tracks that form a loop that it's impossible to route out of otherwise, after first positioning the devices so that the majority of connections between pins are satisfied.

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