0
\$\begingroup\$

I'm trying to derive an equation for wireless network capacity given topological constraints of the nodes and certain obstacles... but before I get that far, I want to understand the most simple case. That is, randomly distributed nodes communicating to random partners. The classic paper for this seems to be Gupta & Kumar. I understand the concepts in the paper, but unfortunately I get lost fairly quickly in their equations.

I understand that a message will be received at \$j\$ if the power from the transmitting node \$i\$ is greater than the power from all other nodes \$k\$ (+ noise \$N\$) by some margin \$\beta\$. That is equation 2 in the paper (and equation 5).

\$ \frac{\frac{P_i}{|X_i-X_j|^\alpha}}{N + \sum_{k \epsilon T}\frac{P_k}{|X_k-X_j|^\alpha}} \ge \beta \$

But I can't see how to get from there to the transport capacity. I guess it will probably depend on assumptions for

  • the transmitting node's choice of intended receiver node
  • where the other nodes are (their distribution in space)
  • what the other nodes are doing at the time (how many nodes are interfering)

Can someone point me in the direction of a derivation which goes a bit more step-by-step than Gupta? Or if you can provide your own derivation that would be exceptional!

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.