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I have this as a homework question and can't seem to find the answer in my notes, book or internet. I know they will behave similarly when there is a reverse polarity on both, but the way my professor phrased it seems like he is talking about the process of turning off the SCR, in which I can't think of any resemblance.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ There is no "ready made" answer. The question is supposed to make you think about how an SCR behaves (in shutdown). So, how does an SCR in shutdown behave? And how does a (power) diode behave? \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Dec 10 '18 at 13:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ To be fair, I don't think I even understood the question exactly. Am I suppose to talk about, I think I'm supposed to talk about how their V-I curves will be similar when the voltage is negative but the way my professor phrased in my native language it seems like he is talking about the process of turning off the SCR, on which I don't think there's any resemblance, so I'm confused \$\endgroup\$ – João Areias Dec 10 '18 at 13:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hint: it's easy to turn on an SCR using the trigger. How do you turn it off? \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Dec 10 '18 at 13:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ By keeping the current below the holding current, but I still can't see it \$\endgroup\$ – João Areias Dec 10 '18 at 13:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ Think about what happens when a diode shuts off. SCR holding current is more about turning on than turning off. You don'y understand that properly. \$\endgroup\$ – Charles Cowie Dec 10 '18 at 13:56
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The PNPN is like a PN in Power Diode because the Vcb's cancel in the PNP+NPN.

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