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system of resistors-in black color- connected by nodes in yellow color

so i have a complex system of resistors i was able to calculate the mesh current of each loop . i was wondering if i can calculate the voltage of a node using the information of the resistor value and mesh current.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Does it generate >=N "unique" equations with N unknown resistors. you need at least 2 outer Node voltages? or? \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Dec 22 '18 at 19:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ i have the resistors value @TonyEErocketscientist \$\endgroup\$ – m.rizk Dec 22 '18 at 19:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ So where are your results? \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Dec 22 '18 at 22:21
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Sure. The current through a resistor is the sum of currents in the two loops it participates in. Knowing that current and the resistor value, you know the voltage drop over that resistor.

Now follow an arbitrary path, touching each node only once, from your ground node to the target node and sum the voltages differences to find out the potential at that target node.

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If all the branches are resistors, then Ohm's law gives you a relation between a branch current and the voltages at the two nodes that it connects.

If there are other kinds of elements in your network, you need to look at the constitutive relations for those elements.

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