1
\$\begingroup\$

G4 bi pin LED bulb. Silicone coated

Hello all. Thanks for the forum.

I have some of these: G4 bi pin LED bulbs. Silicone coated dimmable 12 volt DC. They are 1.5watt.

Although not visible on this photo, the pins are marked "C" to the left and "P" to the right. When viewed with the pins lower most. Eveything else about them appears identical.

Could anyone confirm which poles they signify?

Or are these bulbs not polarity dependent?.

I am a novice. I have a 24/12 volt solar system and am designing a small set of chandliers.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ C for Common and P for Positive would be my guess. \$\endgroup\$ – Richard the Spacecat Dec 29 '18 at 17:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ Silicone coated dimmable 12 volt DC. As these are meant as a drop-in replacement for halogen bulbs, DC is very unlikely. They may be marketed as DC because they do not function on high-frequency AC as common for later halogen power supplies. \$\endgroup\$ – Janka Dec 29 '18 at 17:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ And, in any case, those bulbs you have there are a very cheap design. Better ones feature a COB led as these: image.dhgate.com/0x0/f2/albu/g5/M00/DA/99/… \$\endgroup\$ – Janka Dec 29 '18 at 17:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Janka yes they were pretty cheap. Thanks for taking time to help. I am pretty low-income. I got them here. m.lightinthebox.com/en/p/… They will probably suit my needs as I needed something that is low watt DC, wasn't too complex to create and did not involve using ac invertors. It will be a mobile chandelier. \$\endgroup\$ – Skippi Dec 29 '18 at 18:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ Richard I also suspected similar...I thought "C" for cathode and "P" for positive in a classic chinese/english language mish-mash. But fortunately it seems not to matter. \$\endgroup\$ – Skippi Dec 29 '18 at 18:19
0
\$\begingroup\$

It won't matter which pins you choose as the other side of the photo has 2 more diodes to make a full wave rectifier so it can operate on Vac or any polarity Vdc for the voltage rating given.

P and C could mean something to the factory for assembly process controls but is not useful to you.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ That's very good news thanks Tony EE. So I can wire my bulbs up in parallel and run directly off my 12 volt DC supply with a fuse, switch and a plug. \$\endgroup\$ – Skippi Dec 29 '18 at 18:00
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ I did risk blowing one earlier to check, and it seemed fine either way but I didn't trust my lack of understanding and decided to check with rocketscientists first 😊 \$\endgroup\$ – Skippi Dec 29 '18 at 18:03

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.