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I was recently looking at the circuit for an HF radio amplifier called the "Packer" amplifier. It's a typical HF amplifier that puts out about 35 watts.

The final output stage uses IRF510 MOSFETS connected to a "balun", which is basically just an isolation transformer at RF from what I know.

There is one aspect of it I do not understand:

enter image description here

The points labeled "SWV" are just the supply rail (DC voltage). C4 and C9 are isolation capacitors. What I don't understand is T2 and how it works or what it does. In the documentation it is called a "phase reversal choke". I'm familiar with common mode chokes found in appliances and what they do, but the topology of how this is wired really confuses me.

Wouldn't current just flow from SWV to Q2 as it turns on, taking a path through T2 at terminals 1 and 2 ? Why would any current be present in T1 at all?

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This is subtle.

Remember that T2 is a TRANSFORMER and obeys the usual transformer rules (to a first approximation).

Lets assume Q1 is turned hard on, so the winding 3-4 has the full supply voltage across it, magnetising current flows and voltage is clearly induced in the 1-2 winding which due to the way the thing is phased, adds to the supply voltage as seen at Q2s drain, but Q2 is turned off... It is this voltage that pushes current thru the load T1. So with Q1 hard on, The current flows half to Q1 drain thru T2 3-4 and half to Q1 drain via T2 1-2 and T1 primary (But T2 boosts the voltage available to this path).

Of course this current flowing in T2 1-2 causes current to flow in T2s 3-4 winding, so energy is conserved.

On the other half cycle the behaviour reverses and power is transferred the other way thru T2.

The overall effect is that the current in the T1 primary is half the supply current, but at about twice the voltage.

There is actually another subtle trick you can do with T2 (But that the packer does not exploit) in that if you squint just right T2 is a 4 port hybrid which has the second harmonic power appear on the 'DC input node', this can be exploited to lower the second harmonic content albeit usually not by quite enough to remove the need for further filtering.

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T2 is doing two things. The first thing it's doing is the usual job of an RF choke on a final amp drain (or collector, or anode): it's providing a (practically) open circuit to RF, while providing a short to DC. That makes sure that any RF power generated is available to T2. The other thing it's doing (if it's oriented the way I think it is) is to keep the voltages on the two FETs anti-symmetrical, so that one goes up while the other goes down. This keeps the circuit nicely balanced, even if the FETs aren't.

You could probably get by with a pair of chokes there, in a more typical arrangement. I'm not sure why the author felt that doing it that way would be advantageous.

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T2 is a 1:1 transformer equivalent to a balanced centre tap with DC on the Tap.

If there is any unbalance in T2 of the 1:1 , this can lead to saturation from flux walking.

SIM

This is the ideal result for values given at 30MHz.

enter image description here

The caps are need due to trace inductance not added to simulation.

Note the Current rise time using 0.1 Ohm Logic FETs with Vdd=20V and 170uH 1:1 transformer.

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TI is the outout transformer, T2 is the input choke,

in the basesnse of coil polarity dots they are assumed to all be towards one end of the core (eg. all at the bottom) A voltage downwards on one side of T1 produces an upwards voltage on the other side.

Q2 turns on , current begins flowing from t2(2) to t2(1) producing a voltage across t2(3) and t2(4) that matches the voltage across t2(1) to t2(2)

T2(1) has almost 0V so t2(4) will have almost 2 times SWV.

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