0
\$\begingroup\$

I'm trying to make a peripheral with an embedded USB hub, which will include USB-C 3.1. As I've been researching USB I've found that Microchip has a whole slew of embedded controllers dedicated to USB, like USB5926, but then I've also seen most projects and tutorials use a PIC micrcontroller for a hub. Why would I use one over the other?

*Note I will be using a separate chip either way for the USB hub, just for quantity of ports.

\$\endgroup\$

closed as unclear what you're asking by Chris Stratton, brhans, Ale..chenski, Dwayne Reid, Elliot Alderson Jan 7 at 0:54

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ This is far too broad a question to fit within the mission of this site. Questions here need to be specific and specifically answerable, "Why would I use one over the other?" is neither. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jan 6 at 0:10
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I am sure there is no possibility to make a USB hub, even USB 1.1, using PIC micro-controller. Would you care to provide any links? \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Jan 6 at 0:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ The post specifically says that the hub functionality is being provided by a separate chip, ie, not the MCU. Hence the MCU would be a downstream device hanging off the hub and does not need to use any more recent USB standard than is needed to enable whatever limited communication need it has on its own behalf. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jan 6 at 0:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ As for the USB5926, that is a hub, not a microcontroller. You'd choose between that and other ways of building the hub aspect. And for the peripheral aspect, you still need to chose a USB-enabled MCU, USB-enabled ASIC or USB-enabled something to implement the peripheral-ness. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jan 6 at 0:20
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @ChrisStratton, "That was presumably bad phrasing" - no, it is obviously not a problem with phraseology. The title itself "USB EC vs. PIC MCU" reflects a deep misconception. USB hubs are dedicated data transporting engines that manage data at 500 MBytes/s, using hardware SERDES blocks and providing local link management (clock/symbol locks, active power management, etc). No PIC MCU can go any closer to this kind of data rates and provide this very specific USB 3.1 link functions. Given the absence of more adequate closing category, I would support closing this question as "too broad". \$\endgroup\$ – Ale..chenski Jan 6 at 0:57
2
\$\begingroup\$

The USB5926 you refer to is not an embedded controller, it is a HUB. You can't use it as a (standalone) processor. Hence its application domain doesn't overlap that of USB-capable micro-controllers.

  • "most projects and tutorials use a PIC micrcontroller for a hub"

You should provide links for this, I guess that the project you refer to are not hubs but USB endpoints (or maybe in a few cases USB hosts).

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

I don't know of any PIC MCUs that support USB 3.0 (or 3.1). There'd be no point as none of them will handle 5Gbps data rates.

If you want to make a USB hub for USB 3.x (or even 2.x to be honest), you should go for a dedicated IC for that task.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ That's not really an answer to the question as the question explains that the hub functionality will not be provided by the MCU. The question is not really answerable, but that means it needs to be closed, not that it is open season for non-answers \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jan 6 at 0:09