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IDE -CodeWarrior

Microcontroller-MCF51JM128

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This should be obvious by the MCF51JM128 home page. Click on "tools & software".

Scroll down to "IDE - Debug, Compile and Build Tools" where it lists Codewarrior for MCU. For free, you'll only get the crappy Eclipse debugger though. Useful debuggers will cost money.

However, I would strongly recommend to avoid Codewarrior for MCU, it is an utterly horrible tool chain. Throughout my career I have used at least 50+ different tool chains and this one is by far the worst I have ever encountered, all categories. Everything in the IDE is simply broken.

If you have an older PC you can use the much better Codewarrior Classic 6.3. Unfortunately, NXP has blocked it from use in Windows 7/10 but it can be installed through hacks.

Similarly, LPCxpresso is quite awful too. So unless you can find & afford a good 3rd party tool chain, I would stay clear of NXP products.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It says full chip simulation is only available for RS08 & S08. We are planning to use MCF51JM128. Do you have any suggestion for microcontroller with USB-OTG support & working in 5V. \$\endgroup\$ – Lelouch Yagami Jan 11 at 11:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ @LelouchYagami Who cares about "full chip simulation", that's a software simulator. Meaning the temporary crap which never works well, which you are forced to use until your evaluation board arrives in the mail. If this is for a new product, you should probably stay clear of Coldfire. It is a good family, but old, predating the ARM hype. Nobody knows what will happen to these after the Freescale/NXP merger. They favour ARM and PowerPC cores nowadays. --> \$\endgroup\$ – Lundin Jan 11 at 12:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ Instead, for USB I would definitely go with something ARM Cortex-flavoured. NXP LPC4000 series or some STM32F perhaps. With ARM you get lots of options for good 3rd party tool chains. \$\endgroup\$ – Lundin Jan 11 at 12:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ Problem is 5V. We are working on an industrial project.So to cope with noise on reading data we need to use 5v. \$\endgroup\$ – Lelouch Yagami Jan 11 at 12:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ @LelouchYagami There's plenty of 5V tolerant Cortex M4 - those I mentioned among others. There's also NXP Kinetis, Atmel SAM C etc etc. Though "industry must be 5V" was never much of a valid argument. Most industry electronics switched to 3.3V over 10 years ago. Main reason is to get rid of level converters and multiple voltage regulators. EMC has very little to do with it, since immunity means low resistance/high current, rather than high voltage. \$\endgroup\$ – Lundin Jan 11 at 12:16

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