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I have encountered a three phase ac machine whose name plate contains following information: Y/360 V/90 Hz/2,3 A. I don't know whether it is an induction machine or permanent magnet synchronous machine. Is there any method how to distinguish between them? For example by connecting the machine to a three phase voltage source inverter? Thank you for any ideas.

Nameplate detail

Motor

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    \$\begingroup\$ A picture of the machine? Of the nameplate? \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Jan 15 at 17:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ Does it look like this ? i.stack.imgur.com/zG1sI.png \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Jan 15 at 17:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ The easiest method that comes to mind is: Apply power. If it works, it's an induction machine. If it's a synchronous machine, though, this stands a risk of damaging or destroying it, so I wouldn't recommend doing this if you want to keep the machine. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Jan 15 at 17:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ If it's a PM synchronous machine, you'll be able to feel cogging when you turn the shaft as the poles line up. An induction machine will turn smoothly. \$\endgroup\$ – Phil G Jan 15 at 18:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ The nameplate has a part number, why did you omit that in the question and leave us guessing? I'll place a two bit wager on variable speed synchronous reluctance motor with a rotor that has neither magnets nor windings \$\endgroup\$ – Sunnyskyguy EE75 Jan 15 at 18:03
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There are two sub-categories;

SPMSM (surface permanent magnet synchronous motor)

IPMSM (interior permanent magnet synchronous motor)

Each serve different dynamic loads so that the torque-phase of the motor more closely resembles that of the load. Dynamic load vs phase can vary significantly between pumps and fans.

In this case the Frigoblock implies it is intended for a refrigeration pump. enter image description here

In 2015 Ingersoll Rand acquires FRIGOBLOCK.

A frequency converter changes the frequency of the electric voltage without changing the voltage. The refrigeration machine not only starts up in less time, an inverter-controlled refrigeration appliance can maintain the target temperature within closer limits with less energy. REF

Depending on number of pole pairs, perhaps RPM ranges from 500 to 2,000 rpm from 15 to 90Hz (guess)

Consider something like this.

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You can't tell from that limited information, no. But if it WERE a PMAC motor, then the machine would HAVE TO have a VFD to operate it, you cannot just hook up 3 phase power to a PMAC motor and have it run. So if there is no VFD or Servo drive in the control panel, it's a squirrel cage induction motor.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for your reaction. Do you think it is possible to use scalar or so called V/f control usually used for ACIM also for PMSM? \$\endgroup\$ – Steve Jan 16 at 20:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ No. The control algorithm is much much more complex. In fact most Vector Control capable drives are not even capable of operating a PMAC motor, the drive must be specially designed for it. \$\endgroup\$ – J. Raefield Jan 18 at 1:11

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