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I am working on a project that requires an existing power supply outputting 80VDC @ 60A to be reduced to 50VDC. Current is not really an issue in the application.

Does anyone have any useful suggestions? The big limitation is the physical size of the solution; it needs to be quite small.

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    \$\begingroup\$ We need numbers. How much current, and what are the size limits? How "clean" must the output be (noise, tightness of regulation)? As it stands, this question is far too broad to answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed Jan 21 at 16:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ We need more information here. It's not clear if you want to modify the existing supply (which sounds like it may be too big) or if you want an alternate supply. What's the input voltage? How much current do you need? (Current is always an issue.) \$\endgroup\$ – John D Jan 21 at 16:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ At 60 A current will be an issue. If you think it isn't then please edit your question to explain why not. How big is "quite small"? \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jan 21 at 16:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ Current is not really an issue in the application That's not possible. If it were, I'd simply say: make the current zero and then you don't need anything! You can't have anything smaller than nothing so that requirement is then also met. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Jan 21 at 16:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ One possibility is to modify the regulation point of the existing supply. There's likely a feedback divider monitoring the output voltage and feeding back to a control IC. If you find out what the control reference is you can modify the resistor values to make your output regulation point equal to 50V. You will have to make sure your supply is still stable and can meet all performance goals after the change. You can go here to help with the divider calculations: syncbuck.com \$\endgroup\$ – John D Jan 21 at 17:10
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You can use a buck converter to step down the voltage. BUT you need to calculate the load current first.

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    \$\begingroup\$ This is one way to step down a voltage sure but your answer is a little vague. However, the OP hasn't provided sufficient information to answer this with detail. \$\endgroup\$ – KingDuken Jan 21 at 16:45

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