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I am trying to do a inverter using ferrite core transformer, but the problem is the frequency output from the ferrite core transformer, If I am using that, I will be getting 230V AC but the frequency is much higher >10KHz. Please guide me to obtain 230V, 50Hz AC supply from ferrite core transformer.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Show us your circuit. \$\endgroup\$ – brhans Jan 23 '19 at 3:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ The ferrite transformer is only for a DC-DC boost converter. It runs at many kHz. The 50Hz is done with mosfets (H bridge inverter). If you want to do 50Hz with transformer, you need an iron core transformer, and you have to feed in 50Hz power. [Caution: don't play with high voltages] \$\endgroup\$ – Indraneel Jan 23 '19 at 4:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ Transformers don’t store much energy so the impedance coupling must be low and the drivers much lower ~1% of the impedance of the load converted to the source by /N^2. You have to research this. \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Jan 23 '19 at 6:15
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The ferrite tranformer cant operate at such a high voltage at such a low frequency.

To get the reduced frequency to need to rectify the transformer output and then convert that DC into AC.

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The ferrite transformer is for a DC-DC boost converter working at 50-200 kHz. The 12V is boosted to 230V DC. An oscillator creates a 50 Hz PWM signal modulated onto the boost converter output. This is fed into an H-bridge. The output from the H-bridge is still a square wave (centered at 0V) with a 50-200 kHz carrier frequency, but modulated to 50 Hz. Output inductors and capacitors can be used to make a low pass filter to convert this to true sine wave, but is usually not done in most cheap UPS. This is not a problem for most types of loads.

Here is a video on the PWM scheme https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJqD9-HFULA

The other option is to use an iron core transformer and feed it a sine wave using power transistors. This is what is present in currently available cheap UPS on the market.

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