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I was running through the datasheet of CC2500 (Low-Cost Low-Power 2.4 GHz RF Transceiver) which has a dimension of 2.40mm X 2.40mm approx. It was really amazing to find such transceivers to be fabricated in such a small area.Infact a transceiver requires a lot of R,C and even L.Resistors, Capacitors and semiconductors are easy to be imagined on an IC but an Inductor!!!

I haven't work in any VLSI industry so it would be great if someone can tell how these inductor logic is implemented on IC. Although it is said that gyrators are alternative solution, but thanks for pointing if my knowledge is correct.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Please make it a habit to include a link to the datasheet in your question. It may be helpful for users who want to answer your question. \$\endgroup\$ – stevenvh Sep 23 '12 at 18:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ Thanks Steven, but question has no strong relation with datasheet, however I'll add it :) \$\endgroup\$ – perilbrain Sep 23 '12 at 18:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think the datasheet is relevant. Some devices have a lot of pins for external capacitors and/or resistors. This one seems to need only a couple of external parts. The datasheet also shows a block diagram. Thanks for updating the question. \$\endgroup\$ – stevenvh Sep 23 '12 at 18:23
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Inductors have been fabricated on ICs for a long time now. The inductance can obviously not be that high, but there are various methods to compensate for this.


(source: dow.com)

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Inductors in ICs are so commonplace that there is an industry and research branch for inductance calculation for that purpose.

A note on gyrators is that they can act like inductors I-V characteristic wise, but they cannot store energy. Also, they operate in MHz range in applications that I have seen, to replace very bulky inductors on the filters of those frequencies.

A gyrator would actively consume power, I think it would not resonate due to the fact that it cannot store energy.

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