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I am a poor student, was wondering if anyone has any home-brew recipes for making conductive thread for use in wearable electronics?

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Well you could use some really low gauge wire, but I can't imagine that would save you any money.

150 yards of conductive thread is only $20 at sparkfun.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ oh wow, I thought it was way more expensive than that. Can you solder to it? \$\endgroup\$
    – Allan
    Commented Oct 31, 2009 at 0:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ Most conductive threads can not be soldered to. Instead connections are made by tying them to components. Instead you sew the thread around the components to make a connection. See this instructable for the general idea: instructables.com/id/STN40TRFMMCYRFD \$\endgroup\$ Commented Nov 1, 2009 at 2:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ I just came across another method that claims to work really well, where you get metal beads (at a bead / craft store) and crimp them to the thread. Then solder the bead. Found here: kobakant.at/DIY/?p=1720 \$\endgroup\$ Commented Nov 1, 2009 at 3:32
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Instructables has a post on how to create conductive thread using very fine wire and thread, that combined together to create a strong, low resistance thread.

The principle idea is that you spin the the thread and the fibre together. As Andrew Parnell said, 150 yards of conductive thread is only $20 at sparkfun.

Cheers,

Marcus

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while it's not so much about making conductive thread, here is a good post talking about the different types of commercially available conductive thread. Gives a good run down of various comparisons, where to buy and what they cost. hope this helps! http://www.fashioningtech.com/page/conductive-thread

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