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The potentiometer of my (Kemo M012 Power Control) is mechanically broken and I would like to replace it.

However, I am unsure whether the replacement needs to meet any specific characteristics or if any off-the-shelf potentiometer (with the same maximum resistance) should suffice.

Is there actually any load going through the potentiometer ?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Potentiometers are usually linear or logarithmic, you would need to know which one you are replacing as well. If it is a rheostat (another name for potentiometer, usually used more often in power applications), there could be quite a bit of load going through it, so it would be best to replace it with one that can handle the same power dissipation. \$\endgroup\$ – Ron Beyer Feb 5 at 20:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ @jfrohnhofen "pot" is the usual vernacular shortening of potentiometer, at least in English-speaking regions. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Feb 5 at 22:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Hearth - Indeed, but FYI in German at least, it's poti. See here for confirmation. I've changed the text in the question to the full word. \$\endgroup\$ – SamGibson Feb 5 at 23:05
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I'm guessing that in that black box is a phase controlled triac, and that the potentiometer needs to withstand full 240VAC and provide safety isolation, so don't use a cheap potentiometer with metal shaft and body.

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