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Question: Do "current+old" generation desktop pc's have any built-in means of registering a signal that is modulated on a (220v) AC power output?

Application/context: Suppose your energy company modulates a signal on your 220v/230v AC house/building power supply, is there any way to guarantee the desktop uses that powersource in stead of another powersource without using additional hardware?

Approaches:

  1. I thought it might be possible, if power supply units (PSU)'s have an input voltage sensor which is somehow fed into the motherboard somewhere, before they cancel out all the fluctuations to provide the CPU with a constant DC voltage. But I am not aware of any such sensors and thought perhaps my view/solution space is too limited.

  2. Initially I thought perhaps another approach could be be to set up an extra (USB) measuring device that measures the 220v signal, but that still has 2 problems:

    • There would still be the loophole of the usb device measuring the signal but the desktop actually consuming a different power source.
    • It requires additional hardware which is beyond the scope of the question.

As a response to the questions in the comments, I would like to clarify what I mean with:

Suppose your energy company modulates a signal on your 220v/230v AC house/building powersupply,

I mean that an additional signal is added to the normal/conventional electricity net, by changing the hypothetical pattern* that the normal/conventional electricity network uses, with the function of/by adding another signal. I am not claiming they can but I'm assuming the hypothetical case that they do. A bit like the powerline adapters, except the adapter connected to the router would be placed somewhere before/outside the house by the energy company.

*For the purpose of this question I assume the normal/conventional electricity network follows a pre-determined pattern/signal.

desktop uses that powersource in stead of another powersource

I mean that, suppose if the neighbors have a different additional signal/no signal in their house than you, that it is not possible for the your pc, to register your signal from your households 220V AC electricity network*, while it is actually connected via a long cable to the wall socket of your neighbors building.

*Of course an external device could be made to register a different signal coming from whatever, but that is not intended here. The question is about a sensor already present in the pc, that without physical modification/non-intended-hacking would indicate the PSU uses/consumes/is connected to the electricity network with the registered signal.

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closed as unclear what you're asking by pipe, Edgar Brown, Tom Carpenter, Sparky256, Finbarr Feb 15 at 18:36

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ What do you mean by "Suppose your energy company modulates a signal on your 220v/230v AC house/building power supply" and "desktop uses that powersource in stead of another powersource"? \$\endgroup\$ – Jurkstas Feb 11 at 12:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Jurkstas, thank you for your question, I included the clarifications in the question, do they satisfy your question? \$\endgroup\$ – a.t. Feb 11 at 13:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to EESE. However it's rather clear that you don't seem to even understand what you are asking. This makes it impossible for us to understand it either. I am further intrigued that you have accepted an answer that in my opinion has nothing to do with what I understood your question to mean. \$\endgroup\$ – Edgar Brown Feb 12 at 19:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ @EdgarBrown, thank you, and thank you for your critical feedback. I am indeed struggling with both the terminology and the problem that I intent to ask for the option of a trustworthy measurement, whilst every security measure can be broken. Furthermore I did not think through how the signal could stay unique. So it is good that I am forced to be explicit, I learned what concepts were underdeveloped. I will think about those, and include simplifications and clarifications if I can clarify those concepts. Can you perhaps specify what you understood the question means? \$\endgroup\$ – a.t. Feb 14 at 20:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ I had multiple options: (a) some form of energy multiplexing receiver (I can see someone with a basic exposure to FDM/TDM/CDM having such misconceptions), (b) some form of data communications receiver (which is actually commonly done), (c) something else entirely, given that someone that is asking either (a) or (b) would have at least some basic use of the relevant terminology. But nowhere in there I can conceive of filters in the power supply (that reduce transmitted emissions to avoid regulatory issues) would have anything to do with anything in your question. \$\endgroup\$ – Edgar Brown Feb 14 at 20:28
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Do "current+old" generation desktop pc's have any built-in means of registering a signal that is modulated on a (220v) AC power output?

No. They actually have input filtering in order to meet regulatory requirements - intended to prevent noise from leaking out to mains, though.

if power supply units (PSU)'s have an input voltage sensor which is somehow fed into the motherboard somewhere

The outputs of an ATX PSU must be isolated from mains, which would add a significant cost to such sensor. Standardized desktop and laptop power units are heavily cost optimized.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you, that is clear. I also did not know about the regulatory requirements, I appreciate that additional information. \$\endgroup\$ – a.t. Feb 11 at 12:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ There are also regulations that describe what the PSU has to be immune to. Things like interference, voltage fluctuations, short voltage drop-out, surges, noise, etc. \$\endgroup\$ – Jurkstas Feb 11 at 12:47

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