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A job I'm interested in has a title of "electrical designer". The qualifications are either a Bachelor of Engineering or Electronics Engineering Technology.

Is this not an Engineering job? Accordingly, will I be able to gain experience credit towards my professional engineer title with such a job?

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closed as off-topic by Chris Stratton, Leon Heller, Rev1.0, old_timer, Edgar Brown Feb 13 at 16:46

  • This question does not appear to be about electronics design within the scope defined in the help center.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this site is only about the practice of engineering, not for questions about engineering jobs or education. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Feb 13 at 7:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would say this is engineering field, so obtaining experience in this place may open your engineering career path. Be careful though. 'Electrical engineering/design' may have same basis as 'Electronics engineering/design' but is not the same. \$\endgroup\$ – smajli Feb 13 at 7:53
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There are many "engineering" jobs...

There are many types of "engineer"...

Employers need specific skills so they look for those skills...

What you need to consider is if your qualification and the subjects / modules you took will reply to the needs of the company. If that is a "yes", then the experience will be useful to both of you.

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It depends exactly why you're asking. These terms are fairly loosely defined.

If you want to find out whether the tasks you'd be expected to do will meet your skills, and plans for career development, then you need to dig a bit deeper into the job. What is the company business, and what tasks the job involves.

If will I be able to gain experience credit towards my professional engineer title then you need to go into paperwork mode, and see whether your professional body accepts the particular employer, and their job, as experience. You may need to talk to both, about that specific point, to make sure all the i's are dotted and t's crossed.

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Typically, I've seen designer used to describe someone that works with ECAD tools (e.g. directly works on schematic capture, simulation, and/or layout).

EE or EET can imply a relatively wide range of tasks, so the above would clarify that the position is not in a service, test, or FPGA coding type area.

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The Bureau of Labor Statistics maintains a list of definitions of occupations for the purpose of generating statistics, and some companies try to keep their personnel defined by this, but reality demands far more flexibility.

Designers are to be found both under "engineers" and "drafters" but usually are involved with the creation of detailed design and supporting documentation, and engineers tend to deal with the definition and creation of the data that define the design.

It likely will count towards your PE accreditation, but you need to speak with your professional organization to make sure - there are some requirements of relevancy, and consistency between academic and practical experience gained.

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