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Words are escaping me - literally.

What do you call a bundle or loop or coil of power/control cabling that connects to an apparatus which moves, pivots, or telescopes during operation where the cable is designed to accommodate the motion of said apparatus by some means of extension/retraction?

You see this in various industrial apparatus such as variable geometry conveyor belts, gantry cranes, draw out equipment in racks or electrical switchgear, airport jet bridges, etc;

There are several different types of designs, but they all have some means of accommodating non-trivial amounts of motion in the connected device. The most common designs usually have loops of extra cable hanging from pulleys or sections of conduit/duct.

Here is a good picture that shows the kind of thing that I am asking about. In this instance it is the power and control cable for an overhead gantry crane

http://www.rhclifting.com/s/cc_images/teaserbox_2450395593.jpg?t=1507619289

There is a particular term for this kind of arrangement but I cannot for the life of me recall what it is.

Thanks

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I want to say it's an umbilical cable but I am not confident enough to make that an answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Feb 14 '19 at 0:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ Not sure if it the correct terminology, but "Overhead Power Cord Systems" returns a lot of hits. \$\endgroup\$ – Tyler Feb 14 '19 at 0:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ google flexible cable track .... you will get links to several name variations \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Feb 14 '19 at 6:02
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Cable track is one type . Below photo from this datasheet.

enter image description here

But it sounds like you're talking about a cable sock, some of which are like Chinese finger traps- they grip the cable and allow it to be suspended in one or more loops (photo from this website.

enter image description here

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We always called it a "service loop". If you're buying wire for it, you need to get wire that's rated for flexing (called, in the US, "flex wire" or "flex cable"). The regular stuff breaks after a while.

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