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enter image description here Is it possible to have an AC motor with only a partial stator, one that does not fully encompass the rotor? Refer to the picture to understand what I mean. This would be needed to drive a spherical tire of a car.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The simplest AC motor demonstrated in physical experiments is a wire frame between two permanent magnets. Pretty much fitting the description. \$\endgroup\$ – Eugene Sh. Feb 19 at 19:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes. It should be possible. Afterall, there is such a thing as a linear motor. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Feb 19 at 20:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Maybe an axial flux motor with a caliper type stator. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Feb 19 at 20:12
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It's certainly possible - I built one many years ago to allow a cutaway model of a power tool to run. Bear in mind that a C shaped stator would produce significant radial forces on the rotor shaft if you're trying to produce a lot of power with it, and having two opposing sections of stator, i.e. with a symmetrical gap on opposite sides would balance out the radial forces - but reduce the amount of power you could produce for a given motor size.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Axial flux might be better, if it is a clean sheet design. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Feb 19 at 22:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ Even with axial flux there'd still be a resultant radial load from asymmetry. \$\endgroup\$ – Phil G Feb 19 at 23:03
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Yes, although getting efficiency out of it may be quite difficult. Conceptually, you may want to start with linear motors, and go from there.

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