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I'm new in this kind of thing and I'm using Circuit Wizard (Circuit Simulation Software). I was trying to simulate an overdrive pedal circuit (https://www.instructables.com/id/Overdrive-Pedal/) in Circuit Wizard, but I found some problems...

Some notes that can help somehow:

  1. The 50k Potentiometer in this picture ("Gain"), it's a 100k Linear Potentiometer;
  2. The 100k Potentiometer ("Volume"), it's a 100k Logarithmic Potentiometer;
  3. The 10k Potentiometer ("Tone"), it's a 10k Linear Potentiometer.

For Circuit Wizard Website click on this link

enter image description here

I would like an answer for these questions:

  1. Visualy (in a schematic), can you distinguish a Linear Potentiometer from a Logarithmic Potentiometer?

  2. How do you add both Linear and Logarithmic Potentiometers to a circuit in Circuit Wizard?

Thank you.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Please use the edit link below your question to add a hyperlink to "Circuit Wizard" and explain what it is. The Instructables articles are usually rather long so if there's a schematic then add that into your question and add a credit to the existing link. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Feb 19 '19 at 21:23
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Visualy (in a schematic), can you distinguish a Linear Potentiometer from a Logarithmic Potentiometer?

Generally not. Both types of potentiometer have the same behavior in a circuit, and are represented by the same symbol. As such, there's no need to make a distinction in a circuit simulator.

If you want to annotate a schematic to make it clear that a specific potentiometer should have a logarithmic taper, write the abbreviation "log" close to it.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So... in Circuit Wizard there is only one Potentiometer, and it doesn't say if it is Linear or Logarithmic. But if what you said is true ("Both types of potentiometer have the same behavior in a circuit"), then it won't make any difference (in the simulation obviously). \$\endgroup\$ – Luís Vieira Feb 19 '19 at 22:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ Correct, because the difference between the two types isn't relevant in circuit simulation. \$\endgroup\$ – duskwuff -inactive- Feb 19 '19 at 22:12

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