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I have been trying to create a DC motor controller that can do numerous actions with just the use of one button.

Basically when I click it has to go on way, when I click again it has to stop, and again it has to go the other way and vise versa only using one button. I've been attempting this with a D-FLIP-FLOP, but I have encountered multiple problems along the way that have me thinking new ways to solve it. Any ideas to this silly, but funny problem?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Seems like a job for a small microcontroller. \$\endgroup\$ – Unimportant Feb 22 at 11:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes. Solve it using a microprocessor \$\endgroup\$ – Huisman Feb 22 at 11:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ You can also differentiate between short press and long press, double click etc. using only that one button. \$\endgroup\$ – Huisman Feb 22 at 11:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't want to do it with a microprocessor. Takes all the fun out of it \$\endgroup\$ – Kritix Feb 22 at 12:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ 2 bit counter (4 different modes) - logic gates (decoder) - power amplifier (h-bridge) \$\endgroup\$ – R.Joshi Feb 22 at 13:39
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schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

Figure 1. A CD4017 decade counter with reset on Q4.

How it works:

  • On each press of SW1 the outputs switch sequentially on Q0, Q1, etc.
  • Q1 is wired to your forward control and Q3 is wired to your reverse control. When Q0 or Q2 is on the motor is off.
  • When Q4 is reached it pulls the reset pin high and resets the count.

Problem: on power-up the counter could be at any state including > 4. A solution to this is shown in my answer to Power circuit with a push button. Alternatively you can feed the reset pin via diodes connected to Q4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 to force a reset should the device power up in one of those states.

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