0
\$\begingroup\$

I'm sitting here with a $600 espresso machine with its power transformer not working (no voltage coming out of secondary, with 110V feeding the primary). I've been scouring the internet for a replacement, but the cheapest I've seen is $249. I noticed on the primary side of the transformer, there are two terminals for live and neutral. I checked the resistance on the terminals and got no readings. But there is an extra wire coming out of the winding that goes to the casing between the 2 terminals, but not finished to be used. I did get a reading on resistance when I check that point with the neutral side. So my question is what is this 3rd winding point coming out of the primary side? Can this point be used to give the transformer a second life? If not, what is the closes specs I can get away with as a replacement.enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ You could always use two separate transformers - one 9V and one 15V. \$\endgroup\$ – Finbarr Feb 27 at 0:27
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ examine the transformer closely ..... look for a fuse \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Feb 27 at 0:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's probably there to support other uses (like 100VAC for Japan). If the primary is open, and you don't want to introduce yourself to the joy of transformer rebuilding, and you can't find a fuse -- it's dead. \$\endgroup\$ – TimWescott Feb 27 at 1:52
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Thermofuse inside the transformer? \$\endgroup\$ – winny Feb 27 at 12:44
0
\$\begingroup\$

You could give a try with this transformer: link

The voltages (8V and 16V) are a bit different but remains within almost the 10% range, which the rest should accommodate for, but it might work just as well.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

So I took a chance and fed 120V into the unknown leg of the primary, and guess what, it worked. I'm getting 17.4 and 9.7V on my meter on the secondary. Is 17.4V too high for 15.5V use? Nothing is smoking or burning up so far. I'm afraid to run the machine in case the amp draw may burn something up. Never thought there is second chance on these transformers. Is it possible they made this as a backup? Or is it as mentioned made for 100V use. If I feed 120 into 100V input, you think the transformer will fry up again?

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.