2
\$\begingroup\$

At work, among others, we have overhead power lines for the main grid connection (400 kV, about 1600 MW). The power lines cross a parking lot, and the positions directly under the power lines are blocked with large rocks.

There are some ideas about the reason why parking is not allowed under the power lines, including protection from exposure to electric and magnetic fields, protection from falling ice (it’s in a Nordic country), protection from downed power lines, protection of the power lines (which need a very high availability) from accidents (i.e. fire) of parked cars, and accessibility of power lines for maintenance (however, moving any cars would be easier than removing the rocks).

Anyway, what is the real reason why parking is not allowed under the power lines?

\$\endgroup\$

closed as too broad by Chris Stratton, Elliot Alderson, Andy aka, Leon Heller, laptop2d Feb 27 at 18:48

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ A photo might help. Add one in. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Feb 27 at 15:25
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Falling ice for sure! \$\endgroup\$ – winny Feb 27 at 15:25
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Question which call for speculation do not really fit the stack exchange model - doubly so when they are questions of policy even before questions of fact. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Feb 27 at 15:27
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ One word: Birds. \$\endgroup\$ – CrossRoads Feb 27 at 15:29
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ It isn't that you can't park under the lines, it is that you can't park ACROSS the lines. If you were to park such that your car is parallel with the lines you would be fine. When you park perpendicular to the lines the fields generated by the lines would generate a charge on your car. My brother works in construction and they made everyone aware of this on the site. One guy missed the meeting and had to have his car discharged before he could get out. This only applies to the really high voltage power lines though. \$\endgroup\$ – Stiddily Feb 27 at 15:39
5
\$\begingroup\$

The comment about charging up the vehicle seems to be spot on. This safety publication about Overhead High Voltage Lines says the following.

Under some high-voltage lines, vehicles can collect an induced voltage. This is particularly true if the vehicle is parked on a nonconductive surface such as asphalt or dry rock. You can drain the voltage from your vehicle to the ground by attach- ing a chain that reaches the ground or by leaning a metal bar against your vehicle. The only way to be sure you won’t get shocked is to park your car away from the high-voltage power line.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ That's rather interesting. To collect an induced voltage suggests a static charge which in turn suggests rectification through the wheels / tyres. Anyone got any ideas? \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Feb 27 at 18:39

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.