2
\$\begingroup\$

I'm curious as to the ability of an antenna designed for a specific wavelength, to work on another wavelength. For example, I have a half wave antenna that is 1.5m long, which would be ideal for a 100MHz signal. Now would that same 1.5m antenna work well on a 150MHz signal, or an even higher frequency? At what point would it no longer work? Are there any quantities that are minimized?

\$\endgroup\$
3
\$\begingroup\$

An antenna that resonates at one frequency (e.g., 100 MHz) will also resonate at odd multiples of that frequency (e.g., 300, 500, MHz, etc.). However, the radiation pattern will be different on each of those frequencies. At the lowest frequency, the maximum sensitivity will be broadside to the wire. At higher frequencies, it will shift toward the ends of the wire.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Upvote. I have long used multiple dipoles on a single balun. 80, 40, 20. And I get 15 because of the 40. Sure the SWR is a bit higher because the alignment of the harmonic frequencies is not perfect, but that's why God invented antenna tuners. \$\endgroup\$ – SDsolar May 12 '17 at 17:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.