0
\$\begingroup\$

In a text there is a section regarding a basic example for uncertainty calculation of a resistor. Here is the related part:

enter image description here

Above the text uses the the accuracy of the current source and the voltmeter.

But if we were able to see the voltmeter's data sample measurements as below:

enter image description here

Is the text talking about B type systematic uncertainties given in device datasheets? And if we have the voltage data samples should we also add the standard uncertainty as well?

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

Yes, text is talking about B type.

Should you include A type as well? It depends on your requirements. If you want, you can limit yourself on type A (measurement dispersion, essentially) or type B (instrumentation uncertainty). But normally what metrologists provide with measurements is combined uncertainty. For combined you usually calculate your values from measurements and then assign weighting coefficient (derivative of function) to it.

More information: about types A and B and Combined uncertainty and the GUM bible itself

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.