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I came up with an idea that is likely not worth the trouble, but I love tinkering so I'm curious to see if it's possible.

In short: I have a guitar amp head. It requires 16 or 8 ohms speakers. For sake of simplicity, I'll just focus on the 16 ohms. I have a 4x12 speaker cabinet. All speakers are 16 ohms. I would like to wire them all in parallel within the box so I can toggle them on/off individually. Any combo between 1 and 4 speakers. So I was wondering if I could put a box between the amp head and the cabinet that would have a 4 position switch. One speaker, two speakers, three speakers, four speakers. And each of these positions activates a different circuit of sorts in the box that would keep everything working with what the amp head needs. So position one would basically just pass through. But the others, I'm not sure what they would be. Is this even feasible?

Appreciate any help you may have!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to EE.SE! What have you tried so far? Any ideas or suggestions? We can help you where you got stuck but few people here will design it for you. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Mar 12 '19 at 8:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ what make/model of guitar amp head? \$\endgroup\$
    – user156429
    Mar 12 '19 at 17:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hughes & kettner tubemeister 18. 18/5/1 watt amp. Works with 8-16 ohms \$\endgroup\$
    – Nodnarb
    Mar 13 '19 at 0:41
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The switch box you want is already explained in detail in this very nice article about wiring multiple speakers.

Multiple ways of wiring speakers

enter image description here


Techniques discussed for impedance matching inside the box will lead you to your solution.

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    \$\begingroup\$ This does not answer OPs question. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Mar 12 '19 at 8:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ Appreciate the link. I found a video similar to this article shortly after posting and was shocked something already existed. I have been posting on guitar forums and talked with a couple amp companies with no luck. Is it different when dealing with guitar amps than regular stereo equipment? I'm confused why none of them came up with a similar solution. I know the main difference is I'll be using 1/4" unbalanced cable rather than stereo cable to hook it all up \$\endgroup\$
    – Nodnarb
    Mar 12 '19 at 9:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Nodnarb Guitar Amps are designed to give guitar specific effects. They not only 'tolerate' distortions but can 'add' distortions also as some music form fans love those effects. Music and PA Amps have wider frequency response. Technically sound amplifier is a sound amplifier but application specific features make them different. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 12 '19 at 12:19

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