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I am using the IRS2453 which is an H bridge driver.

The example is page 3 show an input voltage on Vcc of 15V. In page 6 it indicates the recommended Vcc is between Vccuv+ and Vclamp.

On page 7, it indicates the range for Vccuv+ is 10.0V-12.0V, and the range for Vclamp is 14.6V-16.6V. This leaves a guaranteed range of 12.0V to 14.6V for the input.

Why would they show an example with an input of 15V, as this can fall outside of the recommended range if Vclamp were to have a value between 15V and 15.6V?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Perhaps because datasheets are made by humans and humans make mistakes? \$\endgroup\$ – Edgar Brown Mar 16 '19 at 16:36
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From IRS2453(1)D(S) datasheet:

enter image description here

\$V_{CC}\$ can be from \$V_{CCUV+}\$ to \$V_{CLAMP}\$. There is an internal 15.6V zener diode to keep \$V_{CC}\$ clamped below 15.6V (14.6V to 16.6V).

Under-Voltage Lock-Out Mode prevents the chip from turning on until \$V_{CC}\$ is above \$V_{CCUV+}\$ (10V to 12V). As long as \$V_{CC}\$ > \$V_{CCUV-}\$ (8V to 10V), the chip will oscillate. The \$V_{CC}\$ under voltage lockout hysteresis \$V_{CCUVH}\$ typically is 2V or \$V_{CCUV+}\$ - \$V_{CCUV-}\$ = 10V - 8V = 2V. You are driving ac loads, which means the power lines are going to be susceptible to noise. This is just a safety range for the power.

\$V_{CC}\$ can range from (8V to 10V) to (14.6V to 16.6V), once the chip turns on. All of the tests were done with \$V_{CC}\$ = 14V, but 15V makes perfect sense. If \$V_{CC}\$ = 16V, it may be clamped or not.

enter image description here

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