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ESC of motor I have 3 cables (blue,green,yellow) from my ESC to my motor. However I’m confused whether the voltage it provides is AC or DC. Does the nature of the voltage have anything to do with the kind of motor used?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Your ESC appears similar to the one in this diagram. If so, you may be able to figure out your remaining wires from it, although I'm used to red black blue being a wiring combo for low(ish) voltage 3 phase, so blue yellow green seems an odd combo to connect to the motor. \$\endgroup\$ – K H Mar 29 at 3:32
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The voltage is more like AC than DC. The waveform is composed of positive and negative pulses. It will be some version of the following:

enter image description here

With regard to the kind of motor used, all types of brushless motors would have a voltage waveform of the type shown as the output of the ESC and terminal to terminal voltage of the motor windings. For motors with an ESC integrated into the motor housing, the motor winding voltage would be seen only inside the motor.

A DC motor with a commutator and brushes would have DC or pulsed DC at the brushes. The voltage across the rotor windings would be DC, but a part of the windings switch polarity as different commutator segments engage the brushes.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, this is a phase-to-phase measurement as the motor sees. If a phase is instead measured with a scope grounded at the battery the entire waveform would be positive, at least apart from any inductive decoration. However there are real safety concerns in probing around in such a system, so it is better kept as a "thought experiment" \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Mar 27 at 17:28

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