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It seems to me that BNC connectors are only used for coaxial cables. These coaxial cables with BNC connectors are very practical when it comes to plug and play quickly.

But for a balanced signal chain STP cable is used not coaxial. But what equivalent connector is common in electronic instrumentation for STP(twisted shielded pair) cables. Is there a standard plug&play conventional connector for STP? (By plug and play I mean not screw terminal sort of thing but indeed a connector which is similar to BNC or a jack one can easily remove and plug in a second)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ How many pairs are you dealing with here? \$\endgroup\$ – ThreePhaseEel Mar 30 at 5:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Only one pair which will carry one signal channel. So one pair plus a shield. But I dont know where to start with and they are not sold with connectors. So I need connector and build my own for many STP cables. Lemo looks hard to make. Do have any idea? \$\endgroup\$ – user1999 Mar 30 at 15:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ points at Dave's answer (just don't create a pin 1 problem!) \$\endgroup\$ – ThreePhaseEel Mar 30 at 19:48
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In addition to Twinax connectors for applications with stringent impedance control requirements, there are any number of multi-pin circular connectors that can be used. For example, audio gear uses mostly XLR connectors for balanced signals, both analog and digital.

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In my recollection, the de-facto standard in electronic instrumentation with fast plug features, in particular in high-speed electronics used in high-energy Physics research, are connectors made by LEMO. There are many of variants, starting with coaxial, twinaxial, triaxial, and multi-pin connectors. It is a Switz company founded in 1946. Twinaxial example: "K-connector":

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  • \$\begingroup\$ And those connectors are expensive \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike Apr 1 at 15:27

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