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I am making a clock timer for an analog LED clock with ICs 4060 and 4027. The clock signal is going to drive some 4017s. Supply voltage would be from 5V to 9V. My online supplier site shows two 4060s- CD4060 and 74HC4060. Are they interchangeable? If yes, what are the merits and demerits of each? Thanks in advance for any input.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Have you looked at their data sheets before asking the question? Have you noticed their operating voltage ranges and speeds? Do those work for you? Without any information on you application it's unlikely you would get any relevant feedback. You should familiarize yourself with the different logic families. This might point you in the right direction: electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/11109/… \$\endgroup\$ – Edgar Brown Mar 31 at 7:49
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Back in the old days (seventies, eighties) there were chip-series that would "work together nicely" and stuff like that. One series was the 74xxx with subseries like 74LSxxx and 74ACTxxx. Another series was the CMOS series with type numbers in the four thousands.

The functionality of those chips has been "merged" into the 74 series by appending the original number after the 74 and the subfamily identifier.

So the functionality should be mostly the same. There might be subtle differences and if those matter to your project cannot be said offhand. So: Download both datasheets, put them next to each other and try to think of things that are important to you.

You already mention the supply voltage you're going to use: check that for both chips. If it forces you to choose one, you can close the other datasheet and continue looking in the one you've selected.

Once you run out of ideas about what might be important to you, scan the "absolute maximum" section for hints for things that the manufacturer thought important.

Continue down the datasheet looking for things that might matter for your project.

Most likely you're not "on the edge" of what's possible with such chips, so things like "timing" are not likely going to be a problem. Feel free to skip a section like that if it overwhelms you.

On the other hand, actually trying to understand it is also good practice. But my guess is that you are not yet ready for that. Just skip and hope for the best, build your project (it'll most likely work as expected) and gain experience.

With over 30 years of experience I still follow that same tactic. Once in a while I'll hit a snag with a not-working-project and on closer inspection of the datasheet that should have been obvious from the start. Tough luck: redesign the project, maybe patch the board you have and continue on. I think this tactic is much more efficient than spending twice as much time on ALL the datasheets of components in your project and thereby not having to deal with the occasional failure you might into once in a while....

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The CD is old and slow .You do not have to worry about speed for your project .The 74HC is faster and not as old and its thresholds are more compatable with old TTL .All this does not matter for your project ....BUT old CD can run on a DC supply voltage of up to 15VDC and 74HC is designed for 5VDC .15VDC would destroy the 74HC .

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