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I am doing an experiment that involves loading an asynchronous 50 HZ generator. For the load to consume current it has to be a capacitive load to cause a phase shift between the current and the voltage. However, what should be the value of the capacitance of the load ?

Thanks

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Why do you say only capacitive loads can "consume" current? What do you mean by "consume"? \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Apr 2 at 13:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ 'Draw' current . \$\endgroup\$ – Riolite Apr 10 at 14:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Then that's just plain false, because inductive loads can absolutely draw current, as can resistive loads. Where did you get that idea from? \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Apr 10 at 15:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ The load is an RC ckt. \$\endgroup\$ – Riolite Apr 19 at 12:31
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Selecting the capacitor will be a trial and error process. For a single-phase, 230-volt induction generator, start with 25 uF + 33 uF x motor kW rating. For a 3-phase, 400-volt IG, start with 7 uF + 2.9 uF x motor kW rating.

Use AC capacitors such as motor-run or power-factor compensation capacitors. Do not use motor-start capacitors, they are designed for occasional, short-time use, not continuous use.

The capacitance will need to be changed if the load changes very much. If the load includes any induction motors, sufficient capacitance must be added to bring the load power factor to near 1.0.

For additional information look at this PDF. You may want to search other references on using induction motors as generators. The terms induction motor and induction generator are the more common English terms even though asynchronous is generally understood.

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